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2 edition of Susceptibility of pine plantations to attack by the pine shoot beetle (Tomicus Piniperda L.) in southern Ontario found in the catalog.

Susceptibility of pine plantations to attack by the pine shoot beetle (Tomicus Piniperda L.) in southern Ontario

Ryan E. Morgan

Susceptibility of pine plantations to attack by the pine shoot beetle (Tomicus Piniperda L.) in southern Ontario

by Ryan E. Morgan

  • 140 Want to read
  • 33 Currently reading

Published in 2003 .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Statementby Ryan E. Morgan.
The Physical Object
Paginationvi, 69 leaves :
Number of Pages69
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21136720M
ISBN 100612843084

Common Pine Shoot Beetle. Tomicus piniperda (Linnaeus) is a native of Europe and northern Africa that was discovered in Ohio in It was probably imported on wood packing material. The pine shoot beetle feeds on young shoots of pine trees, stunting growth. Tomicus species (Coleoptera, Scolytidae) are important pests of pine forest in Eurasia, Europe and the Mediterranean, with the common pine shoot beetle (Tomicus piniperda) reported to be the second most destructive shoot-feeding species in Europe.

McKellar, A.D. Ice damage to slash pine, longleaf pine, and loblolly pine plantations in the Piedmont section of Georgia. Journal of Forestry . Development of a pest management program for minimizing the economic impact of pine shoot beetle in pine nurseries and plantations of New York. In Proceedings of Regulatory Review of Japanese Beetle and Pine Shoot Beetle, Louisville, Kentucky, Feb. 24–26, , USDA APHIS, Riverdale, Maryland. Google ScholarCited by:

Mississippi landowners have made a strong commitment to planting trees over the last several decades. Financial incentives to encourage tree planting spurred additional interest. As more landowners become involved with tree planting, they learn that proper species selection and careful handling and care of seedlings are vitally important in the success of their reforestation. The Southern Pine Beetle. Chapter 9: Silvicultural Guidelines for Reducing Losses to the Southern Pine Beetle. Roger P. Belanger — Principal Silviculturist, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Southeastern Forest Experiment Station, Athens, Ga. Introduction. The proper silvicultural treatment of forest stands is an essential element of developing .


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Susceptibility of pine plantations to attack by the pine shoot beetle (Tomicus Piniperda L.) in southern Ontario by Ryan E. Morgan Download PDF EPUB FB2

An abundance of recently dead and low-vigour pine trees increased susceptibility of sites to stem and shoot attacks by T. piniperda. Significant negative linear relationships were detected between the number of beetle attacks and the mean height, age, diameter at breast height, basal area, canopy cover, duff depth, and radial growth increments.

The pine shoot beetle, Tomicus piniperda (L.) (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), was first discovered in North America inand by the late s it was associated with tree mortality and stand decline throughout southern Ontario.

To assess whether this beetle was capable of killing vigorous trees (a primary pest) or would kill only trees already stressed (a secondary pest), we Cited by: Susceptibility of pine plantations to attack by the pine shoot beetle (Tomicus piniperda) in southern Ontario February Canadian Journal of Forest Research 34(12) Susceptibility of pine plantations to attack by the pine shoot beetle (Tomicus piniperda) in southern Ontario.

Morgan, R.E. ; de Groot, P. ; Smith, S.M. Year: Catalog ID: Available from: Great Lakes Forestry Centre CFS Availability: PDF (request by e-mail).

Pines (genus Pinus) are the main hosts for the beetle. Most species are attacked, but only the non-native Scotch pine (Pinus sylvestris) seems to suffer badly. Other conifers (for example spruce, larch, fir, Douglas-fir) have also been attacked, but the beetle does not prefer them and only attacks them when little else is left Footnote 1, Footnote 2.

Most damage caused by this species has been reported in areas where pine plantations exist, especially in instances of poorly managed plantations. The PSB mainly targets weak pine trees, but can also attack healthy ones when its populations are abundant.

The damage to pine can have significant economic impacts on. The pine shoot beetle may also attack stressed pine trees by breeding under the bark at the base of the trees.

The beetles can cause severe decline in the health of the trees, and in some cases, kill the trees when high populations exist. susceptible to attack. • Pine shoot beetle is a vector of three species of damaging blue-stain fungi in Europe. Hosts In North America all native pine species are potential hosts of the pine shoot beetle.

The preferred species are red pine, Scots pine, and ponderosa pine. When beetle populations are high, balsam fir, eastern white. Description of the Yunnan shoot borer, Tomicus yunnanensis Kirkendall & Faccoli sp.

(Curculionidae, Scolytinae), an unusually aggressive pine shoot beetle from southern China, with a key to the species of Tomicus. Zootaxa 25– Jump up ^ Ministry of Agriculture and Lands: Pine Shoot Beetle; Jump up ^ "Common Pine Shoot Beetle.

Figure 7. Close up of damage to pine tree by Tomicus piniperda (Linnaeus), a pine shoot beetle, showing infested tip. Photograph by Bruce Smith, USDA AHPIS PPQ, It is believed that four species of pines native to Florida might be susceptible to attack by Tomicus piniperda.

Abstract 1 After a 1‐year, extensive pine looper (Bupalus piniaria) outbreak, plots were laid out to study tree susceptibility to attack, and performance of Tomicus piniperda in pine trees suffering from varying levels of defoliation.

2 Tomicus piniperda was the dominating stem‐attacking species among the primary stem colonizers, and 82% of all trees that died had been colonized Cited by: The objectives of this paper are to create susceptibility maps of lodgepole pine to MPB attacks in Colorado forest during the period from to based on pine structure and to identify the pine structure on Colorado’s MPB epidemic spreading based on resulting susceptibility maps.

Growth reduction of Scots pine, Pinus sylvestris, caused by the larger pine shoot beetle, Tomicus piniperda (Coleoptera, Scolytidae) in New York State.

D Czokajlo, R A Wink, J C Warren, and, S A TealeCited by: Dead and dying pine trees, recently felled pines and pines subjected to stresses such as poor soil conditions, glaze ice and storms should be removed as quickly as possible to eliminate potential egg-laying sites for the common pine shoot beetle.

All this material should be disposed of before beetle emergence. They pose a threat to huge volumes of standing timber (an estimated million m³) in eastern Canada because of their potential to damage plantations of jack pine, red pine, white pine, Scots pine and Laurentian Shield jack pine.

Because of the threat pine shoot beetles pose throughout the region, various methods have been implemented to halt. If the southern pine beetle is to blame, trees will typically die in a directional pattern, progressing out from the epicenter of the attack.

With other pine bark beetles, trees typically die in a patchy or scattered pattern. Photo: Ronald F. Billings, Texas Forest Service, Pitch tubes.

The southern pine beetle's primary targets are pitch pines, red pines and jack pines. Jasper Park's pine beetles may be hardier genetic hybrids, study says B.C. spruce beetle. Figure 2: Unsuccessful mountain pine beetle attack—commonly called a “pitchout.” Figure 3: Pitch tubes and boring dust— indicative of a successful mountain pine beetle attack in lodgepole pine.

Figure 4. Fading mountain pine beetle-killed lodgepole pines. Trees generally fade months after being by: The Southern Pine Beetle Chapter Direct Control. Ronald F. Billings — Principal Entomologist and Head, Forest Pest Control Section, Texas Forest Service, Lufkin, TX.

Introduction. The search for practical and effective methods to protect pine resources from the southern pine beetle has challenged scientists and forest managers for many years.

Because mountain pine beetle attack mature pine stands, an understanding of forest age class dynamics is important to managing forests within the distribution of the beetle. Tomicus piniperda (common pine shoot beetle) is a bark beetle native throughout Europe, northwestern Africa, and northern is one of the most destructive shoot-feeding species in northern Europe.

Its primary host plant is Scots pine Pinus sylvestris, but it also uses European black pine P. nigra, maritime pine P.

pinaster, eastern white pine P. strobus, red pine P. resinosa, jack pine Class: Insecta.Ronald Billings, L. Allen Smith and Michael Murphrey Texas A&M Forest Service. Introduction. The southern pine beetle (SPB) is the most destructive pest of commercial pine forests in Texas SPB infestations can be prevented byTexas.

SPB infestations can be prevented by means of good forest management.Accidental and intentional global movement of species has increased the frequency of novel plant–insect interactions.

In Patagonia, the European woodwasp, Sirex noctilio, has invaded commercial plantations of North American compared the patterns of resin defenses and S. noctilio-caused mortality at two mixed-species forests near San Carlos de Bariloche, Cited by: 2.